Cataracts

Cataract is a clouding of the natural lens in the eye.

More than half the population will develop cataracts by 80 years of age. Symptoms include blurred vision, halos around lights, glare, double vision and difficulty seeing and driving at night.

Cataracts are most commonly due to aging but can occur for other reasons and in the younger population too. Early cataract can often be managed with an updated prescription but surgery is the definitive treatment as the cataract progresses.

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Cataracts

Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration leads to atrophy and scarring of the central macula.

Macular and retinal disease are very common today. The most common conditions include age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The increasing aging population, as well as the increased rates of diabetes, means that macular and retinal disease is becoming ever more common. Much research and funding has gone into developing treatments for these conditions, as well as public health projects to increase awareness.

The most significant advance in the treatment of macular disease arrived in 2006 with antiVEGF intravitreal injections. Prior to this laser treatment was often the only option for selected cases. Now many patients, who would have otherwise lost vision from macular degeneration, can have significant and sustained improvements in vision with antiVEGF treatment.

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Macular Degeneration

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetes can cause serious loss of vision from both macular oedema (swelling) and proliferative retinopathy (retinal detachment or vitreous haemorrhage).

Macular and retinal disease are very common today. The most common conditions include age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The increasing aging population, as well as the increased rates of diabetes, means that macular and retinal disease is becoming ever more common. Much research and funding has gone into developing treatments for these conditions, as well as public health projects to increase awareness.

The most significant advance in the treatment of macular disease arrived in 2006 with antiVEGF intravitreal injections. Prior to this laser treatment was often the only option for selected cases. Now many patients, who would have otherwise lost vision from diabetic macular disease, can now obtain significant improvements in vision with antiVEGF therapy.

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Diabetic Eye Disease

Vitreoretinal Disorders

Vitreoretinal disorders are diseases in the posterior segment of the eye related to the interaction between the vitreous and retina. The most common conditions include retinal detachment, epiretinal membrane (“macular pucker”) and macular holes.

Many vitreoretinal disorders unfortunately have a profound effect on vision and require prompt treatment to prevent permanent visual loss. Modern advances in vitreoretinal surgery technology have improved visual outcomes for patients with these conditions.

Vitrectomy surgery is now performed with microsurgical instruments through small gauge ports allowing for minimal ocular trauma and more rapid visual recovery.

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Retinal Detachment
Epiretinal Membrane
Macular Hole

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is associated with damage to the optic nerve at the back of the eye. One in 10 people over 80 have this disease. Many people unfortunately remain undiagnosed. It is known as the “thief of sight” as it often leads to asymptomatic peripheral visual field loss initially. Patients are unaware of any disease progression in many cases as they do not feel or see any difference. Central visual loss in glaucoma is most commonly in the advanced stages of the disease.

Ongoing monitoring with your eye care provider is essential if there are any early signs or risk factors for developing the disease.

There are two types of glaucoma: open angle, the most common type, and closed angle which is less frequent. Rarely, acute glaucoma can cause a rapid rise in pressure with loss of vision and significant eye pain. This is an ocular emergency.

Again, like other ocular conditions, there have been advances in the treatment of glaucoma and most people, thankfully do not suffer any loss of vision from this disease when it is monitored and managed appropriately. Most treatments involve eye drops or gentle laser treatment, with surgical intervention required only in a small percentage of cases.

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Glaucoma

Strabismus

Strabismus is a visual problem in which the eyes are not aligned properly and point in different directions. One eye may look straight ahead, while the other eye turns inward, outward, upward, or downward. The eye turn may be consistent, or it may come and go. Which eye is straight (and which is misaligned) may switch or alternate.

Strabismus is a common condition among children. About 4 percent of all children in the United States have strabismus. It can also occur later in life. It may run in families; however, many people with strabismus have no relatives with the problem.

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Strabismus